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RESEARCH PAPER
 
CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
 
 

Relationships between serum selenium and zinc concentrations versus profibrotic and proangiogenic cytokines (FGF-19 and endoglin) in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

Andrzej Prystupa 1  ,  
Jarosław Sak 7,  
 
1
Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
2
Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
3
Department of Medical Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
4
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
5
II Department of Radiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
6
Individual Medical Practice, Lublin, Poland
7
Department of Ethics and Human Philosophy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
8
Institute of Rural Medicine, Lublin, Poland
Ann Agric Environ Med 2017;24(3):544–548
KEYWORDS:
TOPICS:
ABSTRACT:
Introduction and objective:
Liver cirrhosis is a disease involving the liver parenchyma, which is characterised by fibrosis and impaired architectonics of the parenchyma with regenerative nodules. The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between stage of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, concentrations of selenium, zinc and profibrotic and proangiogenic cytokines (FGF-19, ENG).

Material and methods:
The study included 99 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and 20 healthy subjects. Ion chromatography with UV/VIS detection was used for determination of zinc ions in the previously mineralized serum samples. The measurements of selenium were performed with the ContrAA700 high-resolution continuum source graphite tube atomic absorption spectrometer. ELISA was used to determine concentration of FGF-19 and ENG in serum samples.

Results:
Concentrations of zinc and selenium were significantly decreased in cirrhotic patients (p<0.001 for both). The highest concentration of FGF-19 was found in Child-Pugh stage C liver cirrhosis patients (806.9±650.3 pg/ml), and was significantly higher than observed in controls (p=0.005) and stage A patients (compensated cirrhosis) (p=0.02). The highest concentration of ENG was demonstrated in the control group (3.24±148 ng/ml) while the lowest in patients with decompensated cirrhosis (7.32±5.39 ng/ml and 7.92±4.18 ng/ml for stage B and C; p=0.03 and p=0.02, respectively). The use of the multiple-variable model demonstrated that the independent factors affecting the concentration of ENG were the concentration of bilirubin (p=0.02), INR (p=0.01) and duration of alcohol abuse (p=0.02). The independent determinants of FGF-19 concentrations were found to be the stage (severity) of liver cirrhosis (p=0.04) and INR (p=0.03).

Conclusions:
Concentrations of zinc and selenium in serum of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis are not independently related to concentrations of FGF-19 and ENG.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Andrzej Prystupa   
Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland, Staszica, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
 
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