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Microbiological assessment of cleanliness of surfaces and equipment in a children’s operating theatre on the example of a selected hospital
Jolanta Gruszecka 1, 2  
,  
 
 
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1
Institute of Nursing and Health Sciences, Medical Faculty, University of Rzeszów, Poland
2
Clinical Department of Microbiology, Regional Clinical Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszów, Poland
3
Gastroenterology Clinic in the Centre for Comprehensive Treatment of non-specific Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Clinical Provincial Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszów, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Jolanta Gruszecka   

Institute of Nursing and Health Sciences, Medical Faculty, University of Rzeszów, Poland
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
The operating theatre is one of the most important places in a hospital. Due to the presence of numerous reservoirs of microorganisms and the invasiveness of surgical procedures it is necessary to ensure high hygiene standards in these locations.

Objective:
The aim of the study was to carry out a qualitative assessment of the microbiological cleanliness of the surfaces and equipment in an operating theatre.

Material and Methods:
The results of microbiological tests of the surfaces and equipment of the Children’s Operating Theatre in Clinical Provincial Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszów, southeast Poland, during 2007–2012 were reviewed retrospectively.

Results and conclusions:
For the analysis, a total of 1,819 swabs were collected, of which 1.05% were positive. Positive results were obtained mainly from samples taken from moist places (57.9%). Among the microorganisms isolated, Gram-negative bacteria constituted the majority (57.9%), Pseudomonas bacteria were found most frequently (31,6%). Isolated microbes can be the etiological agent of nosocomial infections.

 
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ISSN:1232-1966