0.829
IF
20
MNiSW
166.26
ICV
RESEARCH PAPER
 
CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
 
 

Detection of protozoans Babesia microti and Toxoplasma gondii and their co-existence in ticks (Acari: Ixodida) collected in Tarnogórski district (Upper Silesia, Poland)

Marek Asman 1  ,  
Piotr Cuber 1,  
Piotr Szilman 1,  
Ewa Szilman 1,  
 
1
Department of Parasitology, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Sosnowiec, Poland
Ann Agric Environ Med 2015;22(1):80–83
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
Introduction:
Ticks (Acari: Ixodida) are vectors of many pathogens i. a: Babesia microti [Bm] and Toxoplasma gondii [Tg]. In Poland, Ixodes ricinus [Ir] is the main vector of both pathogens. This tick species and pathogens transmitted by them are a significant threat to human and animal health.

Objectives of the study:
Detection of the protozoans Bm and Tg in ticks collected in the Tarnogórski district area.

Material and Methods:
The ticks were collected from vegetation and pets in the spring period of their activity on the territory of the Tarnogórski district. The parasites were preserved in 70% ethanol. DNA was isolated by ammonia method. Bm was detected by nested-PCR using specific primers for the 18S rRNA sequence. To detect the Tg a commercial kit was used. The PCR products were separated on 2% ethidium bromide stained agarose gels and visualised under UV light.

Results:
It was showed that all collected ticks belonged to the species Ir. Bm was detected in 50.87% and Tg in 64.91% of all examined ticks. Co-existence of these both protozoans in 36.84% of total examined ticks was noted.

Conclusions:
The study showed a high risk of exposure to Bm and Tg in the studied area. Ticks Ir play an important role in the transmission of Bm in this region. Demonstrating a high percentage of ticks collected from animals infected with Tg may indicate their important role in the transmission of this pathogen, but it requires a further studies.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Marek Asman   
Department of Parasitology, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Sosnowiec, Poland
eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966