REVIEW PAPER
AEROMYCOLOGY – MAIN RESEARCH FIELDS OF INTEREST DURING THE LAST 25 YEARS
 
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Department of Environmental Biology, University of Rzeszów, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Idalia Kasprzyk   

Department of Environmental Biology, University of Rzeszów, Poland, Rejtana 16c, 35-959 Rzeszów, Poland
 
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2008;15(1):1–7
 
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ABSTRACT
Fungal spores occur very numerously in the air and, on account of their dimensions (several micrometers), are classed as bioaerosols. They are always observed in natural air and their concentration changes depending on environmental conditions. Aeromycology investigates their occurrence in the air of the indoor-outdoor environment. The methods of sampling can be divided into the gravimetric method when the spores fall onto a catching surface by force of gravity, and the volumetric method consisting of analysis of spores contained in a given air unit. The content of fungal spores in air is characterized by a specific seasonal and diurnal cycle. Among other things, these cycles depend on climate and weather conditions, on the accessibility of fresh substrates for the development of the fungus, circadian cycle of light and darkness, and other environmental hardly definable factors. Many fungi undesirably affect human health, cause immunotoxic diseases, and are a frequent cause of allergic diseases. Knowledge of concentrations of airborne fungal spores is especially important for agricultural and occupational medicine. Aeromycology has its application in agrobiology, particularly with respect to pathogenic fungi, and in the conservation of the artistic heritage.
eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966