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CASE REPORT
 
CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
 
 

Peanut allergy as a trigger for the deterioration of atopic dermatitis and precursor of staphylococcal and herpetic associated infections – case report

Dennis Ferreira 1, 2,  
 
1
Fellow by CAPES (Bolsista da CAPES) – Proc. No. BEX 9203 – CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasilia/DF 70040-020, Brazil
2
Veiga de Almeida University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
3
Pediatric Dermatology Service, IPPMG – Martagão Gesteira Pediatric Institute – Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
4
Paulo de Goes Microbiology Institute, Federal University Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
5
Pediatric Allergy Service – IPPMG – Martagão Gesteira Pediatric Institute – Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
6
Service of Medical Genetics – IPPMG – Martagão Gesteira Pediatric Institute – Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
7
University of Groningen, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Microbial Ecology – Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, The Netherlands
Ann Agric Environ Med 2015;22(3):470–472
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial and chronic disease, with genetic, environmental, immunological and nutritional origins. AD may be aggravated by allergies associated with infections. This study aims to describe a paediatric case of AD in which the peanut allergy was the triggering factor to aggravate the disease, and was also the concomitant precursor of staphylococcal (methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, carrier of the Panton-Valentine leukocidine (PVL) genes) and herpetic (Herpes Simplex – HSV) infections. The clinical management approach and nursing strategies promoted a favourable evolution during the hospitalization period, besides the family approach, which was essential to control any flare-up of the disease. Adherence to a recommended diet and the use of strategies to prevent any recurrent infections were important to ensure the patient’s quality of life.
eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966