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RESEARCH PAPER
 
CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
 
 

Comparison of antibacterial-coated and non-coated suture material in intraoral surgery by isolation of adherent bacteria

Klaus Pelz 1  ,  
 
1
Institute for Microbiology and Hygiene, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Freiburg, Germany
2
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany
Ann Agric Environ Med 2015;22(3):551–555
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
Objectives:
In general surgery the incidence of postoperative wound infections is reported to be lower using triclosan-coated sutures. In intraoral surgery, sutures are faced with different bacterial species and the question arises whether the antibacterial-coated suture material has the same positive effects.

Material and Methods:
Triclosan-coated and uncoated suture materials were applied in 17 patients undergoing wisdom tooth extraction. Postoperatively, sutures were removed and adherent bacteria were isolated, colony-forming units (cfu) were counted, and species identified.

Results:
Oral bacteria were found in high numbers (cfu>107) on both Vicryl and the triclosan-coated Vicryl Plus. The total number of bacteria isolated from Vicryl Plus was 37% higher than for Vicryl, mainly due to increased numbers of anaerobes. The number of bacterial strains identified was higher for Vicryl ( n=203) than for Vicryl Plus (n=198), but the number of pathogens was higher on Vicryl Plus (n=100) than on Vicryl (n=97). Fewer Gram-positive strains were found on Vicryl Plus (n=95) than on Vicryl (n=107) and, conversely, more Gram-negative strains on Vicryl Plus (103vs.96).

Conclusions:
In terms of the total number of oral bacteria, and especially oral pathogens, that adhered to suture material, no reduction was demonstrated for Vicryl Plus. The use of triclosan-coated suture material offers no advantage in intraoral surgery.

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eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966