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Seasonal microbiological quality of air in veterinary practices in Poland

Jolanta Sitkowska 1  ,  
 
1
Institute of Rural Health, Lublin, Poland
2
Sub-department of Clinical Diagnostics and Veterinary Dermatology, University of Life Sciences, Lublin, Poland
3
Department of English, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland
4
Sub-department of Internal Diseases of Farm Animals and Horses, University of Life Sciences, Lublin, Poland
Ann Agric Environ Med 2015;22(4):614–624
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ABSTRACT:
Numerous studies focused on the bioaerosols in the areas of industry, agriculture and animal husbandry, concerning both residential and public buildings, have been conducted continuously for many years. The aim of the present work was to determine the concentration and composition of mesophilic bacterial flora in the air of selected medical and veterinary clinics located in the cities and in the countryside. Air sampling was carried out in 2011–2013 in 44 veterinary practices in autumn-winter and spring-summer seasons. The concentration of bacteria ranged from 39 – 5,034 cfu/m3, with higher values recorded in offices operating in the cities. In the examined medical and veterinary offices, Gram-positive bacteria comprised the largest group of microorganisms, among which Gram-positive cocci of the genus Staphylococcus prevailed, with the highest average of 1,074.40 cfu/m3 in urban offices during the autumn season. The smallest group was represented by Gram-negative bacteria, with a concentration of 0.0 – 215 cfu/m3. In total, 93 kinds/species of bacteria were identified. A 12-month series of studies showed the highest mean concentrations of microorganisms in autumn for offices located in the city, while the lowest in winter for rural centres. The environment of veterinary offices is a habitat of pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria, which may pose health problems not only for residents, but also for the animals.
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eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966