RESEARCH PAPER
Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a group of Polish travelers returning from South and South-East Asia, June 2017 – June 2018. Environment- or healthcare-associated?
 
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1
Medical University, Poznań, Poland
2
H. Święcicki University Hospital, Central Microbiology Laboratory, Poznań, Poland
3
Department of Genetics and Pharmaceutical Microbiology, University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Hanna Tomczak   

Central Microbiology Laboratory, H. Święcicki University Hospital, Przybyszewskiego 49, 60-355, Poznań, Poland
 
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2019;26(3):405–408
KEYWORDS
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ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae have spread rapidly through the countries and continents to become a global concern. One of the main reservoirs of NDM-1 positive strains from the Enterobacteriaceae family is the Indian subcontinent (Bangladesh, Pakistan, India).

Material and methods:
During June 2017 – June 2018, rectal swab samples were collected routinely in all patients returning to Poland from South and South-East Asia. During molecular examinations gene blaNDM-1 encoding NDM-1 carbapenemase was detected.

Results:
31 patients were examined after returning to Poland from a trip to South and South-East Asia. The presence of New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase-1 producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was confirmed in three patients (9.7%) returning to Poland from travels to India. All the positive patients were hospitalized during the trip in a New Delhi hospital.

Conclusions:
Digestive tract carriage of NDM in a group of Polish travelers is a significant health and epidemiological problem. The study confirms the necessity for screening for carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE), particularly among travellers. Rectal swabs should be collected in every case of patients returning from international trips, and the possibility of environment-associated infections should be emphasized.

 
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