0.829
IF
20
MNiSW
166.26
ICV
 
 

Second inter-laboratory study comparing endotoxin assay results from cotton dust.

David T.W. Chun 1  ,  
Victor Chew 2,  
Terry Gordon 4,  
Robert Jacobs 5,  
Ragnar Rylander 10,  
Peter S Thorne 11,  
Eugene M White 12,  
Varina C Gunn 13,  
 
1
Cotton Quality Research Station, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Clemson, South Carolina
2
Biometrical Services, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Gainesville, Florida, (Retired)
3
School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
4
Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, Tuxedo, New York
5
Graduate Program in Public Health, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA
6
Program for Respiratory Health and Climate, Department of Occupational Medicine, Solna, Sweden
7
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia
8
Kuopio Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Kuopio, Finland
9
Clinic of Allergies and Respiratory Disease, Saint-Pierre University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium
10
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
11
College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
12
Milacron, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
13
NIOSH, Division of Applied Research and Technology, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
14
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark
Ann Agric Environ Med 2002;9(1):49–53
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
Previously, a large two-part inter-laboratory round robin endotoxin assay study was completed. This first study showed that when cotton dust samples, which are practically identical, are assayed for endotoxin that the intra- laboratory results had a very small variation while intra-laboratory results of the sample had a very high variation. In the first part of the study, each laboratory followed its own in-house assay protocol; but in the second part of the study, when the extraction protocol was standardized, the inter-laboratory results showed a lower variation, which suggested that with further standardization, further reduction of differences between laboratories might be achieved in order that results between laboratories would become more comparable. The results stimulated interest in extending the study to include cotton dust with two levels of endotoxin, standardization of the extraction protocol, and using the same assay kit from the same production lot. The results of this second round robin endotoxin assay study indicate that differences between laboratories are still high, but most of the laboratories could discern the cotton dusts with the different levels of endotoxin.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
David T.W. Chun   
Cotton Quality Research Station, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Clemson, South Carolina
eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966