0.829
IF
20
MNiSW
166.26
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RESEARCH PAPER
 
 

Molecular identification of Giardia duodenalis isolates from domestic dogs and cats in Wroclaw, Poland

 
1
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinic of Diseases of Horses, Dogs and Cats, Division of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
2
Department of Immunology, Pathophysiology and Veterinary Preventive Medicine, Division of Immunology and Veterinary Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
3
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinic of Diseases of Horses, Dogs and Cats, Division of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
4
Department of Food Hygiene and Consumer Health Protection, Division of Food Microbiology and Processing Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Ann Agric Environ Med 2016;23(3):410–415
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
[i][/i][b]Introduction.[/b] [i]Giardia duodenalis[/i] ([i]G. intestinalis[/i]) is a common protozoan causing gastrointestinal disorders in many species of mammals. The genus of [i]Giardia[/i] has high molecular diversity. Dogs and cats, in addition to their typical infection with assemblages C, D and F, may be a reservoir of zoonotic assemblages (A and B). [b]Objective.[/b] The aim of this study was a genetic characteristic of [i]Giardia[/i] isolates of dogs and cats from the area of Wroclaw (Poland). [b]Materials and method.[/b] A total of 128 and 33 faecal samples from dogs and cats, respectively, were analyzed by routine coprological methods. The animals were diagnosed on the presence of [i]G. duodenalis[/i] antigens in faeces soluble with the use of SNAP [i]Giardia[/i] (IDEXX Laboratories) immunosorbent assay. 27 DNA isolates of [i]Giardia [/i]were subjected to molecular identification (PCR-RFLP). [b]Results and conclusions.[/b] The prevalence of [i]G. duodenalis[/i] was 21.1% (27/128) in dogs and 15.1% (5/33) in cats. In dogs, C assemblage was present in 18 (81%) positive stool samples, D assemblage in 2 (9%) samples, B assemblage present in one (4.5%), and mixed assemblages (C and D) occurred in one (4.5%) sample. F assemblage was found in 4 (80%) cats’ positive stool samples and A assemblage occurred in one case (20%). Confirmation of the presence of A and B zoonotic assemblages suggests that infected pets can be a threat to human health. This study describes for the first time the presence of mixed infections within host-specific C and D assemblages in dogs in Poland.
eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966