0.895
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MNiSW
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RESEARCH PAPER
 
 

Effect of transdermal hormone therapy on platelet haemostasis in menopausal women

 
1
Department Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital-Research Institute, Lodz, Poland
2
Nicolaus Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland
3
Independent Consultant, London, United Kingdom
Ann Agric Environ Med 2015;22(1):167–171
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
[b]Introduction[/b]. Despite the undeniably positive effect on the quality of life of menopausal women, menopausal hormone therapy (HT) also has negative side-effects, which include, among others, thromboembolic complications. [b]objective[/b]. To assess the effect of a popular type of this therapy – transdermal HT on platelet hemostasis, which plays a significant role in intravascular coagulation. [b]Materials and method[/b]. The study group consisted of 92 postmenopausal women: 1) group G1 (n=30), treated with transdermal HT (17β-estradiol 50 μg/day plus NETA 170 μg/day); 2) group G2 (n=31), treated with the above transdermal HT and low dosage of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA); 3) control group P (n=31). All the women qualified for the study had two or more risk factors for arterial thrombosis, such as: smoking, hypertension, visceral obesity, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, elevated levels of PAI-1, and increased fibrinogen, increased activity of coagulation factor VII. Results. After three months of therapy, in the G1 group there was a decrease in platelet count (p = 0.004) and a decrease in GP IIb/IIIa – a platelet receptor for fibrinogen (p = 0.022). In the G2 group, no changes in the tested parameters were observed. conclusions. 1) Transdermal HT in the form of combined, estrogen-progestogen patches favourably modifies platelets haemostasis, reversing the adverse effects that occur after menopause. 2) The use of low ASA doses as a thromboprophylaxis in short-term transdermal HT is not necessary.
eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966