CASE REPORT
Dysphagia as a symptom of anterior cervical hyperostosis – Case report
 
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1
University of Physical Education in Warsaw, branch in Biała Podlaska, Poland
2
Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University, Lublin, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Piotr Piech   

Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, ul. Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090, Lublin, Poland
 
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ABSTRACT
Degenerative lesions with hyperostosis on the anterior surface of cervical spine are common in clinical practice. In addition to pain being an effect of spinal dysfunction, they sometimes cause difficulties in swallowing or speaking as well as breathing disorders. A 52-year-old farmer with 4-year history of gradually intensifying dysphagia was admitted to hospital due to inability to intake a solid food, significant weight loss, and because of the appearance of a new symptom – dysphonia. Previous conservative treatment for swallow difficulties was ineffective. CT revealed a bone excrescence on the anterior surface of two cervical vertebrae which caused an oesophageal obstruction and compression of the vocal folds. Structural abnormalities of cervical spine should be considered in differential diagnosis of symptoms from the oesophagus and upper respiratory tract, especially when a first-line conservative treatment is not effective. In these cases, surgical removal of the osteophyte is an effective way of treatment.
 
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