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RESEARCH PAPER
 
 

Comparison of antibacterial-coated and non-coated suture material in intraoral surgery by isolation of adherent bacteria

Klaus Pelz 1,  
 
1
Institute for Microbiology and Hygiene, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Freiburg, Germany
2
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany
Ann Agric Environ Med 2015;22(3):551–555
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
Objectives. In general surgery the incidence of postoperative wound infections is reported to be lower using triclosan-coated sutures. In intraoral surgery, sutures are faced with different bacterial species and the question arises whether the antibacterial-coated suture material has the same positive effects. Materials and Methods. Triclosan-coated and uncoated suture materials were applied in 17 patients undergoing wisdom tooth extraction. Postoperatively, sutures were removed and adherent bacteria were isolated, colony-forming units (cfu) were counted, and species identified. Results. Oral bacteria were found in high numbers (cfu>10[sup]7[/sup]) on both Vicryl and the triclosan-coated Vicryl Plus. The total number of bacteria isolated from Vicryl Plus was 37% higher than for Vicryl, mainly due to increased numbers of anaerobes. The number of bacterial strains identified was higher for Vicryl ( n=203) than for Vicryl Plus (n=198), but the number of pathogens was higher on Vicryl Plus (n=100) than on Vicryl (n=97). Fewer Gram-positive strains were found on Vicryl Plus (n=95) than on Vicryl (n=107) and, conversely, more Gram-negative strains on Vicryl Plus (103vs.96). Conclusions. In terms of the total number of oral bacteria, and especially oral pathogens, that adhered to suture material, no reduction was demonstrated for Vicryl Plus. The use of triclosan-coated suture material offers no advantage in intraoral surgery.
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eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966