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RESEARCH PAPER
 
 

[i]Toxoplasma gondii[/i] in protected wildlife in the Tatra National Park (TANAP), Slovakia

 
1
Institute of Parasitology SAS, Slovak Republic
2
Institute of Parasitology SAS, Slovak Republic, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Košice, Slovak Republic
3
Research Station and Museum of the Tatra National Park, Tatranská Lomnica, Slovak Republic
Ann Agric Environ Med 2014;21(2):235–238
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
[i]Toxoplasma gondii[/i] is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite that infects a broad spectrum of warm-blooded vertebrate species. As a part of the food chain, farm animals play a significant role in transmission of [i]T. gondii [/i]to humans, while rats and mice serve as a main source of infection for free-living animals. The spread of toxoplasmosis in the human population is due to the interchange of the domestic and sylvatic cycles. During 2009–2011, a survey on toxoplasmosis distribution was conducted in wildlife of the Tatra National Park (TANAP) in Slovakia. A total of 60 animals were examined. The presence of [i]T. gondii[/i] was detected by means of molecular methods based on TGR1E gene analyses. The highest prevalence was recorded in birds (40.0%), followed by carnivores (30.8%) and rodents (18.2%). RFLP analyses of SAG2 locus confirmed in birds the genotype II and III, belonging to the avirulent strain; rodents exclusively had genotype I, characterised as a virulent train, and in carnivores all three genotypes were detected. These results present the first survey on the parasite’s occurrence in several species of free-living animals in the TANAP area. An epidemiological study confirmed the prevalence of 30.0%, implicitly referring to the level of environmental contamination with [i]T. gondii [/i]oocysts.
eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966