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RESEARCH PAPER
 
 

[i]Neospora caninum[/i] and [i]Toxoplasma gondii[/i] antibodies in red foxes ([i]Vulpes vulpes[/i]) in the Czech Republic

Eva Bártová 1,  
Ivan Nágl 2,  
 
1
University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, Department of Biology and Wildlife Diseases, Brno, Czech Republic
2
State Veterinary Institute, Prague, Czech Republic
Ann Agric Environ Med 2016;23(1):84–86
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
[b]Introduction and objective.[/b] Neospora caninum and [i]Toxoplasma gondii [/i]are worldwide spread parasites, causing serious illnesses in sensitive animals; toxoplasmosis is also important zoonosis. Although neosporosis is not considered as a zoonosis, it leads to aborted births in cattle, as well as paresis and paralysis in dogs. [b]Objective. [/b]The aim of this study was to discover the prevalence of N. caninum and [i]T. gondii [/i]antibodies in red foxes ([i]Vulpes vulpes[/i]) in the Czech Republic. Materials and method. Sera of 80 foxes from 8 regions of the Czech Republic were tested for antibodies to [i]N. caninum[/i] and [i]T. gondii[/i] by competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) and indirect ELISA. All samples were simultaneously tested by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) to detect both [i]N. caninum[/i] and [i]T. gondii [/i]antibodies. [b]Results.[/b] Antibodies to [i]N. caninum[/i] were found by IFAT in 3 (3.8%) red foxes with titre 50 and in 2 (2.5%) red foxes with inhibition 42.7% and 30.2 %. Antibodies to [i]T. gondii [/i]were found in all tested animals in both IFAT (titres 50 – 6400) and in ELISA (S/P ranging from 34% – 133%). [b]Conclusion. [/b]This is the first prevalence study of [i]N. caninum[/i] and [i]T. gondii [/i]antibodies in red foxes in the Czech Republic. The results obtained show that red foxes are exposed at different levels to both protozoan infections, and thus could play an important role in the transmission cycle of [i]N. caninum[/i] and [i]T. gondii[/i] in sylvatic cycle.
eISSN:1898-2263
ISSN:1232-1966